nyartstudies

thepacegallery:

Reblog of the day!  You can see Robert Irwin’s newest work at our upcoming exhibit Dotting the i’s & Crossing the t’s: Part I.  The opening will be next Wednesday, April 25th, from 6-8pm at 32 East 57th Street, we hope you can attend! 
dequalized:

Light and Space, an installation by artist Robert Irwin, Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, 2007.

thepacegallery:

Reblog of the day!  You can see Robert Irwin’s newest work at our upcoming exhibit Dotting the i’s & Crossing the t’s: Part I.  The opening will be next Wednesday, April 25th, from 6-8pm at 32 East 57th Street, we hope you can attend! 

dequalized:

Light and Space, an installation by artist Robert Irwin, Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, 2007.

(via pacegallery)

In 2010 visitors to Metropolitan Museum’s roof could climb a jungly maze of bamboo stalks. Starting in May they can moonwalk through the bubblelike pods of “Tomás Saraceno on the Roof: Cloud City,” a utopian constellation by that Argentine artist. 

In 2010 visitors to Metropolitan Museum’s roof could climb a jungly maze of bamboo stalks. Starting in May they can moonwalk through the bubblelike pods of “Tomás Saraceno on the Roof: Cloud City,” a utopian constellation by that Argentine artist. 

Review of Jon Kessler’s show at Salon 94 Bowery’s gallery, last month. 

Machines for perception and belief

The Blue Period installation,created by Jon Kessler, is like a three-dimensional Necker, a perfect example of a multistable perceptual phenomena in which there are unpredictable sequences of spontaneous subjective changes. In other words, it’s impossible to recognize one unique interpretation or visual pattern in it, since its planes will appear to be continuously popping up in front of the others, shuffling the references that would make us perceive the cube, as if it were positioned towards a precise direction.

What we are saying by analogy is that this complex work challenges ones unique and coherent experience of an exhibition. For the occupation of Salon 94 Bowery’s space is a remarkable attack on the modernist assumption that the white cube is the only rightful space for showing art. The contamination of the high walls with blue splash about paint, the maze of cables, that describe how such spectacle has been staged, the accumulation of layers of video screens, the fragmented celebrity portraits hanging on the walls, the human scale photos posing as spectators and the anxious vigilance cameras, are all decisive to a unique experience of immersion in which our senses are overloaded.

Another concept comes to mind while we continue to tumble down the rabbit hole of art’s historical strongholds questioned in this exhibition. In Renaissance times, the rebirth of humanism and its challenging of religious dogmas depended on an epistemological guarantee. The observation of phenomenons, and their representation by an artist was a firm path to knowledge. But in the world post Marshall McLuhan an artist has to question: what if the direct contact with a given object or event has been substituted ­with the fast glimpse of its image and the distracted hearsay of its report? What if our knowledge of the world is now always intermediated by a medium, and its complex set of attributes? Although we could all say that through it, we achieved a broader range of consciousness on things occurring much further and faster than our human capacity of making ourselves present and in contact with a given reality; who can say that the choice of what is to be showed of an event, is its objective description, and not the advertisement of an idea aimed to lead ones take or influence his response? The question today is not if what we see is the truth, but how and which informations are been broadcasted, and, foremost, with what interest?

After a ten-year hiatus in the showing of his work, Kessler connected the moving gears used in his early kinetic sculptures with small common cameras, shortly after 9/11 took place. He describes his first work to do so, One-hour photo, as a response to not being able to get the images of the planes colliding into the towers out of his head. That work was an effort to reproduce the point of view that the terrorists had in the pilots cabin. Abdicating commonly used video editing softwares, Kessler reproduced the cockpit image of the planes zooming into the towers with a mechanical device, and created a system that would serve him well in future more complex works. Which would usually range from massively reproduced images taken from newspapers and magazines, excerpts of movies, TV news reports and toys, to the actual presence of his audience, like in this latest Gesamtkunstwerk, total work of art, displayed at Salon 94 Bowery. Where he seems to be much more interested in the process of gathering, editing and broadcasting information, than with portraying the developing historical milestones of our time. The strike on the towers, the war in Iraq, the torture on Abu Ghraib, all themes for earlier works, now seem to have been exchanged to what seems to be an interest for critically comprehending the ways in which things are advertised in this society of spectacleinformation era and brave new world that we have been living in, where everything screams for attention and nothing is important.

The persecuted creator of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, said in an interview published in the Rolling Stone magazine’s last issue, that: “All human systems require authority, but authority must be granted as a result of the informed consent of the governed. Presently, the consent, if there’s any, is not informed, and therefore it’s not legitimate” More than ever, there is an urgent need to rethink the ways in which information and images are been presented to the public, Kessler has consistently addressed this issue, and this exhibition is no exception. 

nycartscene:

Continues thru May 20:

The Illusion of Democracy
 Charles Atlas

Luhring Augustine Bushwick, 25 Knickerbocker Ave., Brooklyn, NY
Fri 10-6pm, Sat & Sun 12-6pm

a solo exhibition of the American film and video artist Charles Atlas. Atlas is a pioneering figure in film and video; for over four decades he has stretched the limits of his medium, forging new territory in a far-reaching range of genres, stylistic approaches, and techniques. Throughout his production, Atlas has consistently been deeply involved in fostering collaborative relationships, working intimately with such significant artists and performers as Leigh Bowery, Michael Clark, Douglas Dunn, Marina Abramovic, Yvonne Rainer, Mika Tajima and the New Humans, Antony and the Johnsons, and most notably Merce Cunningham, with whom he worked closely for a decade from the early 1970s through 1983.

Seeds of awareness

Ai Weiwei’s work, Sunflower Seeds, opened at Mary Boone Gallery in New York, in the midst of the shocking public disclosure of working conditions in Apple’s main supplier, Foxconn. The colossal factory is responsible for horrific suicide rates amongst its workers, who, in some cases, have to assemble the same electronic pieces 5200 times a day, for starvation wages, in 16 hours shifts.

The uniqueness of this exhibit is mainly based in the contrast between the process of building the work, and the Chinese workers present martyrdom. More than a spatial intervention, made by thousands of seeds manually built and painted in porcelain, it is a social experiment that uses the traditional way of making Chinese vases, to generate income for thousands of families. Following some of the principles of “Relational Aesthetics,” he connected western art audience’s hunger for spectacular exhibitions with the needs of a striving and forgotten population; avoiding art’s present dead-end of producing objects which would later be turned into financial bonds, to actually intervene in a community, and change it.

Weiwei also aims at his government’s long lasting effort for ideological dominance over freedom of speech. The fabricated seeds are a poetic strike on the old metaphor used by Mao’s regime - people are like sunflowers that must turn to be bathed by the sun’s light or its leader’s message. That blow has a fatal aftermath of presenting the artist’s role as a competing model of leadership, one that creates a collective experience to raise consciousness, one that points to our own disturbing part in the current privileging of our consumption choices over the well being of others.

Wanderlust 2

Chris Burden, um dos maiores artistas contemporâneos, abriu no último dia 14 em Los Angeles mais uma de suas instalações utilizando modelos infantis de montar. Declaradamente influenciado por seu pai, um antigo engenheiro, Burden cria desde a obra Medusa’s Head de 1989, imensas esculturas que reproduzem de forma assombrosa estruturas projetadas pelo homem, como pontes, prédios, ferrovias.

Em Metropolis 2, ele foi mais longe e criou uma cidade inteira com rampas que a atravessam em diferentes alturas, sobre as quais circulam cerca de 100 mil carros de brinquedo numa velocidade impressionante de 380 km/h, caso estivessem numa escala 1:1. Em diversos pontos do trabalho os carros param em verdadeiros engarrafamentos, e toda a mecânica que move as rampas precisa ser interrompida para que um assistente do artista possa recolocá-los em fluxo. A forma com que ele faz isso? Retirando com as mãos centenas de carrinhos. A obra parece funcionar em ciclos, nos quais carrinhos são acrescentados até o ponto em que comecem a comprometer a circulação de todos e são novamente retirados. Lembra algum lugar?

Link para o museu em Los Angeles - http://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/metropolis-ii

Desorientados pelo belo

Porque esse é um blog, e blogs reapresentam imagens e notícias já apresentadas em outros blogs, mesmo que antigas, aqui vão algumas imagens da exposição de 2010 realizada pelo artista Dinamarquês Olafur Eliasson e o arquiteto chinês Ma Yansong para o Ullens Center em Pequim.

Nesta instalação, intitulada: “Feelings are Facts”, nossa percepção usual do espaço é desafiada por uma densa camada de cor, que é resultado do encontro da luz projetada do teto, com a neblina que preenche uma imensa sala. Apesar de belo e impressionante, é muito possível que este trabalho seja lido por historiadores no futuro como um marco do esgotamento da pesquisa de base fenomenológica, do esforço de desmaterialização da obra de arte, iniciada por artistas como Robert Erwin, James Turrell, Hélio Oiticia e Carlos Cruz Diez. Para onde mais nos levará a experiência da cor, quão mais etérea poderá uma obra se tornar?