nyartstudies

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is a view into a manic installation called “paintingassupermodel”, by Franklin Evans. It’s now filling the Ameringer McEnery Yohe gallery in New York. The title is a clever updating of “Painting as Model”, the name of a famous 1993 book by art historian Yve-Alain Bois, but sped up to the pace of the 21st century. There’s not even time for a break between words. 
Evan’s installation does a pretty good job conjuring the feel of art as it is now experienced, as a ceaseless barrage of image and information and commerce that we’re supposed to take as-is, without too much processing or doubt. “Paintingassupermodel” levels the playing field between Matisse and Photoshop. What I couldn’t decide, as I took in the piece, was whether its frantic complexities acted as an invitation to dig deep to figure them out, or to skim along across their surfaces. 
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is a view into a manic installation called “paintingassupermodel”, by Franklin Evans. It’s now filling the Ameringer McEnery Yohe gallery in New York. The title is a clever updating of “Painting as Model”, the name of a famous 1993 book by art historian Yve-Alain Bois, but sped up to the pace of the 21st century. There’s not even time for a break between words.

Evan’s installation does a pretty good job conjuring the feel of art as it is now experienced, as a ceaseless barrage of image and information and commerce that we’re supposed to take as-is, without too much processing or doubt. “Paintingassupermodel” levels the playing field between Matisse and Photoshop. What I couldn’t decide, as I took in the piece, was whether its frantic complexities acted as an invitation to dig deep to figure them out, or to skim along across their surfaces.

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

Reblogged from BLAKE GOPNIK on art

archdaily:

World Cup coverage has brought Brazil to the forefront of the public’s attention. While the country’s hasty construction of 12 massive stadiums has received criticism, this article from Christopher Hawthorne at the LA Times reveals that Brazil is, now more than ever, a hotbed of architectural progress. In light of this, we’ve compiled some of our favorite works from this year’s World Cup host country, including: Tacoa ArquitetosAdriana Varejão GalleryJPGN House by Macedo, Gomes & Sobreira, a welcome center by Rocco, Vidal + arquitetos, and Um House by Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados.  Also included is the 360° Building by Isay WeinfeldGaleria House by MACh Arquitetos,Ipes House by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Lair Reis, a night club by Muti Randolph + Marcelo Pontes + Zemel + Chalabi Arquitetos, and NITSCHE ARQUITETOS’ Bernard Luis housing condominium.  Enjoy!

Reblogged from ArchDaily

newmuseum:

A huge round of applause to Ragnar Kjartansson’s troubadours, who ended their marathon performance last night! Over the course of the exhibition, these intrepid young souls played the same song over and over 6,000 times (that’s 308 hours, 18,480 minutes, or 1,108,800 seconds). Here are the final moments of their performance.

Reblogged from New Museum

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux painted this wild little image in about 1870, and it’s now one of the most impressive and surprising pieces in the survey of his work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The canvas shows his wife giving birth (so I’m not sure why the experts are in doubt about its date). It must be one of the first – and only – Old Master pictures to document that moment. Whatever the drawing’s relationship to an actual scene Carpeaux might have witnessed, it is amazing that he could conceive of birthing in such grandly romantic terms, and that he would want to claim to have made a record of it.
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux painted this wild little image in about 1870, and it’s now one of the most impressive and surprising pieces in the survey of his work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The canvas shows his wife giving birth (so I’m not sure why the experts are in doubt about its date). It must be one of the first – and only – Old Master pictures to document that moment. Whatever the drawing’s relationship to an actual scene Carpeaux might have witnessed, it is amazing that he could conceive of birthing in such grandly romantic terms, and that he would want to claim to have made a record of it.

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

Reblogged from BLAKE GOPNIK on art

art21:

"It’s not just what I say about the work…it’s about what I miss—what I couldn’t see in the images of the work." —Gabriel Orozco

New episode from Art21’s Exclusive series: Gabriel Orozco conducts what he calls a “Mirror Crit”—during which he presents a student’s artwork as if it is his own.

Orozco conceived of the Mirror Crit model after doing one-on-one critiques with college art students, where they typically explain or defend their work. Orozco sought an alternative to help students better understand what their images communicate. He discusses each photograph without having previous knowledge of the student’s background or intentions, allowing the images to, in a sense, speak for themselves. The Mirror Crit session in this film features the work of Maximiliano Siñani, and took place as part of Gabriel Orozco’s Spanish Lessons project at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, in late 2013.

WATCH: Gabriel Orozco: “Mirror Crit”

IMAGES: Gabriel Orozco performs a “Mirror Crit” of student Maximiliano Siñani’s work at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, 2013. Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Gabriel Orozco: “Mirror Crit”. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

Reblogged from ART21 on Tumblr