nyartstudies

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux painted this wild little image in about 1870, and it’s now one of the most impressive and surprising pieces in the survey of his work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The canvas shows his wife giving birth (so I’m not sure why the experts are in doubt about its date). It must be one of the first – and only – Old Master pictures to document that moment. Whatever the drawing’s relationship to an actual scene Carpeaux might have witnessed, it is amazing that he could conceive of birthing in such grandly romantic terms, and that he would want to claim to have made a record of it.
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux painted this wild little image in about 1870, and it’s now one of the most impressive and surprising pieces in the survey of his work at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. The canvas shows his wife giving birth (so I’m not sure why the experts are in doubt about its date). It must be one of the first – and only – Old Master pictures to document that moment. Whatever the drawing’s relationship to an actual scene Carpeaux might have witnessed, it is amazing that he could conceive of birthing in such grandly romantic terms, and that he would want to claim to have made a record of it.

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

Reblogged from BLAKE GOPNIK on art

art21:

"It’s not just what I say about the work…it’s about what I miss—what I couldn’t see in the images of the work." —Gabriel Orozco

New episode from Art21’s Exclusive series: Gabriel Orozco conducts what he calls a “Mirror Crit”—during which he presents a student’s artwork as if it is his own.

Orozco conceived of the Mirror Crit model after doing one-on-one critiques with college art students, where they typically explain or defend their work. Orozco sought an alternative to help students better understand what their images communicate. He discusses each photograph without having previous knowledge of the student’s background or intentions, allowing the images to, in a sense, speak for themselves. The Mirror Crit session in this film features the work of Maximiliano Siñani, and took place as part of Gabriel Orozco’s Spanish Lessons project at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, in late 2013.

WATCH: Gabriel Orozco: “Mirror Crit”

IMAGES: Gabriel Orozco performs a “Mirror Crit” of student Maximiliano Siñani’s work at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, 2013. Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Gabriel Orozco: “Mirror Crit”. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

Reblogged from Art21 on Tumblr

art21:

"My videos always involve some idea of a human being in a unusual situation—and what happens."
—Bruce Nauman

The latest episode from Art21’s Exclusive series features previously unreleased footage from 2000 with Bruce Nauman, wherein the artist discusses his video work, Poke in the Eye/Nose/Ear (1994).

WATCH: Bruce Nauman: “Poke in the Eye/Nose/Ear”

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Bruce Nauman: “Poke in the Eye/Nose/Ear”. © Art21, Inc. 2013. Artwork Courtesy: Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Walker Art Center.

Reblogged from Art21 on Tumblr

let-s-build-a-home:

odditiesoflife:

World’s Largest Stone Buddha

An ominous colored statue, this gigantic Buddha is the largest in the world. Called the Leshan Giant Buddha, the construction of this enormous carved deity began during the Tang Dynasty between 618AD and 907AD. What’s truly fascinating about this statue, aside from its size, is that it was sculpted directly out of the face of a cliff.

At the deity’s feet is the confluence of three rivers, the Minjiang, Dadu and Qingyi, located in the southern part of the Sichuan province near the city of Leshan in China. This incredible Buddha is also the tallest pre-modern statue in the world. The statue’s home is the Mount Emei Scenic Area which has been listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996.

There are two ways to get a close-up view of this impressive sight. One is to take the perilous path down the cliff face, walk in front of the Buddha and climb up the other side, as the people in the picture are doing. A more relaxing method is to take a tour boat and sail down the river. He’ll be waiting for you.

source 1, 2, 3

(via gasoline-station)

Source Wikipedia

Reblogged from Curious History

ryanpanos:

Sydney Opera House’s 40th anniversary | Jørn Utzon | Via

If Jørn Utzon did not exist, we would have to invent him. His story, mostly the legend of that single and singular building, the Sydney Opera House, provides the enduring foundational myth for all contemporary architectural practice. Utzon is our sage Kenobi, our renegade Solo, our heroic Skywalker, all in one. He looked the part, too: an architect out of central casting in the Gary-Cooper-as-Howard-Roark mould, as tall as Rem Koolhaas, as beautiful as Jacques Herzog, as Danish as Bjarke Ingels.

(via wblut)

Source ryanpanos

Reblogged from Designer | Curator | Brother